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The KYDRA Club
THE BEST TYPE OF YOGA FOR YOUR PERSONALITY

The last decade has seen a boom in yoga everywhere. Singapore is no exception, with studios offering a wide variety of practices.

All this is awesome. However, sometimes, it can feel like there are way too many yoga options! That's what your Kydra squad is here for. Let us help you figure out which type of yoga is most suited for you based on your personality type.

I "OM"

Like yoga, there are several different categories for personality types, from the sixteen "socio-types" of the Myers-Briggs Type indicator to Carl Jung's Eight Basics. For simplicity, we'll stick to the four significant descriptors that incorporate the many different types and suggest yoga practices that are right for you. Remember that these are merely guidelines. The best person who knows you best - is you.

Type A

Are you more goal than detail-oriented? Do you like being in charge? Are you competitive, driven, and adaptable?

Chances are you're a Type A personality.

More extroverted Type A's may enjoy the challenge of Acro Yoga and Aerial Yoga. These two types engage the whole body with a range of positions that engage core muscles. As you improve, you can try other more energy-intensive variations which fit well with a personality that can quickly become bored with slower-paced activities.

For quieter Type A's, meditative yoga that is still challenging works well. Check out Yin Yoga, which involves slow, deep, relaxing stretches, and is an excellent way to switch off a constantly on-the-go brain.

Type B

Type B's are often social butterflies who enjoy being around people and are the centre of attention. Being naturally outgoing, they readily take to new experiences. They are often seen as good motivators, ideators, and dreamers.

Extroverted Type B's tend to lose focus quickly. A practice that helps you focus but is dynamic enough to keep you engaged is ideal. Vinyasa yoga fits the bill to a T since it uses a variety of poses and has many different kinds that all encourage flow.

It's hard to think of an "introverted people-person," but they exist. If you feel this is you, look into more personal practices that focus on the self, such as Yoga Therapy, which targets individual needs. Mysore Ashtanga allows practitioners to grow at their own pace while still being challenged.

Type C

Type C's tend to be very analytical. This personality type is thoughtful and looks at situations in a precise way.

It's no surprise that a person who likes rules appreciates a practice with an orderly flow. Dynamic Hatha Yoga focuses on controlling one's mind through poses and breathing techniques. This benefits people who are drawn to logic as sequences follow a structure.

Attention to detail is another hallmark of Type C. Iyengar yoga is very precise as placements and alignments are of utmost importance. Experiential yoga that connects the body and mind is also a good option. If you'd like to explore something different, Scaravelli is a type of Hatha yoga that encourages play and exploration.

Type D

There is security in taking it slow and steady, in perfection through repetition. Sound familiar? Hello, Type D, with your observant, low-key, and dependable personality.

Easy-going but not lazy, Type D's are suited to practices that offer variety. Look into Vinyasa, an umbrella term for many different types of exercise. The spontaneity is rooted in tradition and still follows a form, giving you just a good mix of play but within boundaries.

Anusara is a practice of dynamic, graceful flow. Understanding the why's and how's of things appeals to Type D's, and Anusara teachers are likely to explain the details of your anatomy and alignment. Mix it up with a few classes of Sivananda, whose philosophy is anchored on proper diet, breathing, relaxation, exercise, and meditation.

MEET YOU ON THE MAT

If the above seems a little too complex, try this method instead:

1. What holds your interest for more extended periods? Is it an activity with structure and reliable motions or one with looser rules with room to play?

2. What is your fitness level, and what do you wish to achieve? For example, if you are prone to injuries, choose a gentler practice that can help you restore your strength first.

3. What do you want to get out of yoga? Are you looking for a way to reconnect with your meditative self? Are you primarily looking for low-impact cardio to stretch out your tired muscles?

Gears For Your Best Practice
Gears For Your Best Practice

DISCLAIMER: THE VIEWS AND OPINIONS EXPRESSED HERE ARE OF THE AUTHORS AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE OFFICIAL POLICY OR POSITION OF KYDRA. ANY CONTENT PROVIDED BY OUR WRITERS ARE OF THEIR OPINION, AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO MALIGN ANY ORGANIZATION, COMPANY, INDIVIDUAL AND MORE.